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Lindsey’s story

Lindsey talks frankly about the impact of living with FCS.
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Pat

I have been very fortunate to have traveled a lot, and the majority of trips have not resulted in a bout of pancreatitis, nor any other symptoms – but not all, and I’ve learnt, albeit the hard way, a lot of coping travel strategies. Travel and Christmas celebrations have brought me my toughest challenges.
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Aurelie and Ella

I sometimes wonder about his future, how will this happen? Will she accept her illness? What if one of these little classmates gives her a biscuit? And if later, in her adolescence, she decides to be rebellious and eat what is not good for her? What if she wants to have a baby?
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Marc

Because of multiple and many sorts of medical tests I've stayed at the hospital for the first 9 months of my life (I've read my medical register).
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Krish

Like many LPLD sufferers, my troubles really started in adolescence and when I started at University. I began to get frustrated that I couldn't just eat out for dinner on a whim or drink alcohol as I pleased.
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John

I was born in London in 1954 and I have lived with LPLD since the age of 11 (and at age 51 diagnosed with Type II Diabetes).
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Catherine

The infants school I attended insisted that I should eat separately from the other children as “sandwiches from home” were not part of the curriculum. Some of my earliest memories were of sitting alone in an empty classroom, quaking at the sound of footsteps in the corridor.
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Molly and Ali

Yes its hard when she's invited to parties and people always say "but she is going to be so healthy and slim" which is true, but i feel like saying "but she'll never eat cake, ice cream, chocolate, bacon sandwiches, drink wine with her friends, sit on the beach and eat fish and chips out of chip paper, devour a subway after a night out......" all these things are going to be so hard. And I am quite scared about her growing up and the choices she might make.
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Jill

LPLD and diabetes together mean that the range of food that I can eat is ridiculously limited. I feel excluded from any conversation about food unless I want to do the big explanation about LPLD, which usually I don’t. It’s surprising how many conversations about food happen in everyday life. At least in mine they do.
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Katie

My childhood was an endless cycle of the same simple meals over and again. As an adult, I became obsessed with finding new meals to cook. Every day I have to cook a proper meal or have something prepared. There is no fast low-fat food. My grocery bills are ridiculous as 'healthy' food is generally at a premium.
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